Project 35: colour relationships

Task: Take one photo for each combination of primary and secondary colours. Adjust the distance, focal length or framing.

Complementary Colours

Colours opposite each other on the colour circle appear to be balanced, they complement each other. Due to the difference in relative brightness the proportions for each pair of complementary colours may vary in order to maintain balance in the image.

Red & Green (1:1): The leaves and branches divide this image diagonally in half. The shallow depth of field blends the greenery in the bottom right half whilst the red buds and leaves are mainly in-focus in the top left half of the image. Not all of the top half of the image is red, but the focusing compensates for this to balance the red with the green.

Orange & blue (1:2): The above photograph clearly shows a boy wearing an orange bib and a man wearing a blue football shirt. The footballer is obviously taller than the boy, reinforcing the 1:2 relationship. Meanwhile the female autograph hunter is wearing black, which doesn’t interfere with the colour relationship.

Yellow & violet (1:3): It was extremely harder to find an occurrence of these colours complementing each other. I zoomed into this flower with a macro lens. I would question whether this photograph is balanced because the yellow is not as bright as the violet.

This street entertainer is wearing a very bold blue suit which fills the frame. Tension is created with the bright green bag in the bottom left-hand corner.

The orange beak stands out in the middle of the frame in focus, revealing some texture. The complementary yellow with violet in the background is out of focus and gives this image a bright contrast.

The strong bold orange flower creates tension weighing down on the much smaller green stalk.

I really like this photograph. The green runner looking at the viewer in the foreground is the first part of the image you look at but then your eyes drift to the blurred purple runner on the left edge of the frame wearing rabbit ears.

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